CDC Eviction Moratorium: What you Need to Know

The federal government, through the Center for Disease Control, has announced a temporary halt on evictions through December 31, 2020 to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. Under the order, landlords and property owners are prohibited from evicting certain tenants impacted by COVID-19. If you are an immigrant, you may have concerns about claiming protection under the eviction moratorium. While we think the risk is minimal, we provide the information below to help you decide what is best for you and your family.

CDC Evictions Moratorium Flyer (English)
CDC Evictions Moratorium Flyer (Spanish)

How do I Qualify?

You qualify for the temporary protection against eviction if one of the following applies in your situation:

  • You cannot pay your full rent payment because of household income, loss of compensable hours of work or wages, lay-offs, or extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses.
  • Your income is below $99,000 annually for an individual/ $198,000 annually for a couple.
  • You are using your best efforts to make timely partial payments that are as close to the full payment as your circumstances permit.
  • You have used best efforts to obtain all available government assistance available for rent or housing.
  • If evicted, you will become homeless or will have to move in with others in close quarters.

How do I claim protection under the Temporary Eviction Moratorium?

To claim the protection against eviction, every adult tenant must sign an affidavit that includes an agreement to pay any accumulated rent arrears after December 31, 2020.

Why might I worry about signing the affidavit as an immigrant?

An immigrant may be denied a visa, lawful permanent resident status, or reentry into the US (as a lawful permanent resident) if she or he is likely to become a public charge. Public charge is defined as someone who is primarily dependent on the government for subsistence.

Why I SHOULD NOT worry about signing the affidavit even though I am an immigrant:

  • Getting help under the Temporary Eviction Moratorium is not considered cash or other financial assistance that could count against you as a federal benefit for the public charge test.
  • The income limit for the federal moratorium is substantially higher than the income threshold for the public charge test. When you state that your income is not above $99,000/$198,000 annually, you do not admit that your income is below 125% federal poverty guideline ($32,750 annual income for family of 4) and, therefore, you do not jeopardize your immigration application.

Is it conceivable that my immigration application could be denied because I signed the affidavit stating that I cannot afford my rent?

It is conceivable but very unlikely and, certainly, there should be a legal challenge to a finding of public charge on this basis.

Remember that public charge DOES NOT APPLY to:

  • Asylum or Refugee status
  • Green Card renewal
  • TPS, U or T Visa status
  • DACA status or renewal
  • Special Immigrant Juvenile Status
  • Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
  • Immigrants who already have LPR/ a green card

CONTACT CHARLOTTE CENTER FOR LEGAL ADVOCACY TO SPEAK TO SOMEONE ABOUT YOUR OPTIONS.

  • 704-376-1600
  • Línea en español 800-247-1931

Obtenga La Ayuda Que Necesita Bajo La Moratoria Temporal De Desalojo

El gobierno federal, a través del Centro para el Control de Enfermedades, ha anunciado una suspensión temporal de TODOS los desalojos hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2020 para evitar una mayor propagación de COVID-19. Según la orden, los propietarios tienen prohibido desalojar a ciertos inquilinos afectados por COVID-19. Si usted es un inmigrante, es posible que le preocupe reclamar protección bajo la moratoria de desalojo. Mientras creemos que el riesgo es mínimo, la siguiente información puede ayudarle a decidir qué es lo mejor para usted y su familia.

¿Cómo califico para la moratoria?

Usted califica para la protección temporal contra el desalojo si alguna de las siguientes situaciones le aplica:

  • No puede pagar el pago total del alquiler debido a los ingresos del hogar, la pérdida de horas de trabajo o salarios compensables, despidos o gastos médicos extraordinarios de su bolsillo.
  • Sus ingresos son menos de $99,000 anuales por persona o $198,000 por pareja.
  • Está haciendo todo lo posible para realizar pagos parciales puntuales que se acerquen tanto al pago total como lo permitan sus circunstancias.
  • Ha hecho todo lo posible para obtener toda la asistencia gubernamental disponible para alquiler o vivienda.
  • Si lo desalojan, se quedará sin hogar o tendrá que mudarse con otras personas cercanas.

¿Cómo reclamo protección bajo la Moratoria Temporal de Desalojo?

Para reclamar la protección contra el desalojo, todos los inquilinos adultos deben firmar una declaración que incluye su acuerdo de pagar los atrasos de alquiler acumulados después del 31 de diciembre de 2020.

¿Por qué podría preocuparme firmar una declaración como inmigrante?

A un inmigrante se le puede negar una visa, el estatus de residente permanente legal o el reingreso a los EE. UU. (como un residente permanente) si es probable que se convierta en una carga pública. La carga pública se define como alguien que depende principalmente del gobierno para su subsistencia.

Porque no DEBO preocuparme por firmar la declaración a pesar de que soy un inmigrante?

  • Obtener ayuda bajo la Moratoria de Desalojo Temporal no es considerado dinero en efectivo u otra asistencia financiera que pueda contarse en su contra como un beneficio federal para la prueba de carga pública.
  • El límite de ingresos para la moratoria federal es sustancialmente más alto que el límite de ingresos para la prueba de carga pública. Cuando declara que sus ingresos no superan los $ 99,000 / $ 198,000 anuales, no admite que sus ingresos estén por debajo del 125% de la línea de pobreza federal (Ingresos anuales de $ 32,750 para una familia de 4) y, por lo tanto, no pone en peligro su solicitud de inmigración

¿Es concebible que mi solicitud de inmigración pueda ser negada por firmar una declaración declarando que no puedo pagar el alquiler?

Es concebible pero muy improbable y definitivamentedebería haber una impugnación i legal contra una determinación de carga pública basado en esto.

Recuerde que la carga pública NO APLICA a:

  • Asilados o refugiados
  • Renovación de su permiso de residencia
  • TPS, Visa U o Visa T
  • Estado de DACA o renovación de DACA
  • Estado Especial de Inmigrante Juvenil
  • Ley de Violencia Contra la Mujer (VAWA)
  • Inmigrantes que ya tienen Residencia Permanente

Comuníquese con Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy para hablar con alguien sobre sus opciones.

  • Línea en español 800-247-1931
  • charlottelegaladvocacy.org

Unemployed or working fewer hours during COVID-19? 5 things to consider

Many people are trying to figure out what their options are after losing their jobs or having work hours reduced during COVID-19. Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy is here to help. Contact us if you need assistance figuring out your options. Here are 5 ways we can help you and your family remain stable: 

1.  Unemployment Benefits:

  • You should apply for unemployment benefits right away. You can apply online at des.nc.gov or by calling 1-888-737-0259. If you cannot get through, keep trying and document your attempts.
  • Remember to fill out the weekly certifications online at des.nc.gov or by calling 1-888-372-3453 every week, even if your application has not been approved yet or you have been disqualified for benefits and have filed an appeal.
  • If you are self-employed, haven’t worked recently, or you are applying for or receiving disability benefits you may be eligible for unemployment benefits if you are out of work or unable to work due to COVID-19. This includes parents who must stay home because their children are out of school.
  • During this emergency, the amount of unemployment benefits has been increased by $600 per week through July 31, 2020. You can also receive the benefits for more weeks.
  • Immigrants with work authorization may be eligible for unemployment benefits. Unfortunately, undocumented immigrants are not eligible.
  • Call Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy’s Unemployment Insurance COVID-19 Response Project at 980-256-3979 if you have questions about unemployment benefits, are having trouble applying, or have been denied benefits.

2.  Stimulus Payments:

  • Most people should get a stimulus payment from the IRS of $1,200 for each adult and $500 for each child under age 17. You can get this payment even if you are not required to file a tax return.
     
  • You must be authorized to work in the U.S. to be eligible for these payments, typically this means you have a SSN that’s valid for employment. Unfortunately, this means many immigrants may not be eligible for a stimulus payment.
     
  • If you have not received your payment, call Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy’s Taxpayer Clinic hotline at 980-202-7329

3. Evictions, Foreclosures, Utility Cut-Offs and Student Loan payments

  • You cannot be evicted by your landlord or have your house foreclosed until after a court hearing. Those court hearings are on hold at least until June 2020.
  • If you have a federally backed mortgage loan such as Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, VA, USDA, FHA or Home Equity Conversion mortgage (“Reverse mortgage”), you may be entitled to two 180-day forbearances on your mortgage payments without late fees being added.
  • Utilities, including electric, gas, and water services are prohibited from disconnection for customers unable to pay during the COVID-19 pandemic and from collecting fees, penalties, or interest for late payments until June. Residential customers have at least six months to pay outstanding bills.
  • Certain student loans may be entitled to have their payments suspended through September 2020.
  • Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy or Legal Aid may be able to help you prevent eviction, foreclosure, or utility cut-off. Call us at 704-376-1600.

4. Health Care Coverage:

  • You and your children may now be eligible for Medicaid. 
  • If you cannot get Medicaid, you may be able to enroll in Obamacare/Marketplace coverage with financial assistance if you recently lost your health coverage or had a change in circumstances. You have 60 days after losing your coverage or the change to enroll.
  • If you are already enrolled in Obamacare/Marketplace and cannot pay your premiums, you may qualify for lower premiums.
  • Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy’s Health Insurance Navigator Project can help you find the best and most affordable coverage options for you and your family. We can help you complete an application, update your Obamacare/Marketplace coverage, or answer general health insurance questions. We can also help if you get denied for coverage or services. Call 980-256-3782 to schedule a free, over the phone appointment today!

5. Food Assistance:

  • You may be eligible for food stamps. The amount of food stamp benefits has been increased and time limits/work requirements for some people have been waived during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy can help you apply for food stamps over the phone. We can also help if you get denied. Our help is free. Call us at 980-256-3782.
  • Even families not eligible for food stamps will receive an EBT card in the mail to use to buy food if their children qualify for free and reduced lunch at school. Your immigration status does not matter. If you do not get this card, call us at 704-376-1600.
  • Families with no income can also get cash assistance for their children from Social Services under the Work First program. The amount of Work First benefits have been increased and work requirements waived during the pandemic. 

    Apply by phone by calling Social Services at 704-336-3000. If you get denied or cannot apply, call us at 704 376-1600.