CDC Eviction Moratorium: What you Need to Know

The federal government, through the Center for Disease Control, has announced a temporary halt on evictions through December 31, 2020 to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. Under the order, landlords and property owners are prohibited from evicting certain tenants impacted by COVID-19. If you are an immigrant, you may have concerns about claiming protection under the eviction moratorium. While we think the risk is minimal, we provide the information below to help you decide what is best for you and your family.

CDC Evictions Moratorium Flyer (English)
CDC Evictions Moratorium Flyer (Spanish)

How do I Qualify?

You qualify for the temporary protection against eviction if one of the following applies in your situation:

  • You cannot pay your full rent payment because of household income, loss of compensable hours of work or wages, lay-offs, or extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses.
  • Your income is below $99,000 annually for an individual/ $198,000 annually for a couple.
  • You are using your best efforts to make timely partial payments that are as close to the full payment as your circumstances permit.
  • You have used best efforts to obtain all available government assistance available for rent or housing.
  • If evicted, you will become homeless or will have to move in with others in close quarters.

How do I claim protection under the Temporary Eviction Moratorium?

To claim the protection against eviction, every adult tenant must sign an affidavit that includes an agreement to pay any accumulated rent arrears after December 31, 2020.

Why might I worry about signing the affidavit as an immigrant?

An immigrant may be denied a visa, lawful permanent resident status, or reentry into the US (as a lawful permanent resident) if she or he is likely to become a public charge. Public charge is defined as someone who is primarily dependent on the government for subsistence.

Why I SHOULD NOT worry about signing the affidavit even though I am an immigrant:

  • Getting help under the Temporary Eviction Moratorium is not considered cash or other financial assistance that could count against you as a federal benefit for the public charge test.
  • The income limit for the federal moratorium is substantially higher than the income threshold for the public charge test. When you state that your income is not above $99,000/$198,000 annually, you do not admit that your income is below 125% federal poverty guideline ($32,750 annual income for family of 4) and, therefore, you do not jeopardize your immigration application.

Is it conceivable that my immigration application could be denied because I signed the affidavit stating that I cannot afford my rent?

It is conceivable but very unlikely and, certainly, there should be a legal challenge to a finding of public charge on this basis.

Remember that public charge DOES NOT APPLY to:

  • Asylum or Refugee status
  • Green Card renewal
  • TPS, U or T Visa status
  • DACA status or renewal
  • Special Immigrant Juvenile Status
  • Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
  • Immigrants who already have LPR/ a green card

CONTACT CHARLOTTE CENTER FOR LEGAL ADVOCACY TO SPEAK TO SOMEONE ABOUT YOUR OPTIONS.

  • 704-376-1600
  • Línea en español 800-247-1931

Obtenga La Ayuda Que Necesita Bajo La Moratoria Temporal De Desalojo

El gobierno federal, a través del Centro para el Control de Enfermedades, ha anunciado una suspensión temporal de TODOS los desalojos hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2020 para evitar una mayor propagación de COVID-19. Según la orden, los propietarios tienen prohibido desalojar a ciertos inquilinos afectados por COVID-19. Si usted es un inmigrante, es posible que le preocupe reclamar protección bajo la moratoria de desalojo. Mientras creemos que el riesgo es mínimo, la siguiente información puede ayudarle a decidir qué es lo mejor para usted y su familia.

¿Cómo califico para la moratoria?

Usted califica para la protección temporal contra el desalojo si alguna de las siguientes situaciones le aplica:

  • No puede pagar el pago total del alquiler debido a los ingresos del hogar, la pérdida de horas de trabajo o salarios compensables, despidos o gastos médicos extraordinarios de su bolsillo.
  • Sus ingresos son menos de $99,000 anuales por persona o $198,000 por pareja.
  • Está haciendo todo lo posible para realizar pagos parciales puntuales que se acerquen tanto al pago total como lo permitan sus circunstancias.
  • Ha hecho todo lo posible para obtener toda la asistencia gubernamental disponible para alquiler o vivienda.
  • Si lo desalojan, se quedará sin hogar o tendrá que mudarse con otras personas cercanas.

¿Cómo reclamo protección bajo la Moratoria Temporal de Desalojo?

Para reclamar la protección contra el desalojo, todos los inquilinos adultos deben firmar una declaración que incluye su acuerdo de pagar los atrasos de alquiler acumulados después del 31 de diciembre de 2020.

¿Por qué podría preocuparme firmar una declaración como inmigrante?

A un inmigrante se le puede negar una visa, el estatus de residente permanente legal o el reingreso a los EE. UU. (como un residente permanente) si es probable que se convierta en una carga pública. La carga pública se define como alguien que depende principalmente del gobierno para su subsistencia.

Porque no DEBO preocuparme por firmar la declaración a pesar de que soy un inmigrante?

  • Obtener ayuda bajo la Moratoria de Desalojo Temporal no es considerado dinero en efectivo u otra asistencia financiera que pueda contarse en su contra como un beneficio federal para la prueba de carga pública.
  • El límite de ingresos para la moratoria federal es sustancialmente más alto que el límite de ingresos para la prueba de carga pública. Cuando declara que sus ingresos no superan los $ 99,000 / $ 198,000 anuales, no admite que sus ingresos estén por debajo del 125% de la línea de pobreza federal (Ingresos anuales de $ 32,750 para una familia de 4) y, por lo tanto, no pone en peligro su solicitud de inmigración

¿Es concebible que mi solicitud de inmigración pueda ser negada por firmar una declaración declarando que no puedo pagar el alquiler?

Es concebible pero muy improbable y definitivamentedebería haber una impugnación i legal contra una determinación de carga pública basado en esto.

Recuerde que la carga pública NO APLICA a:

  • Asilados o refugiados
  • Renovación de su permiso de residencia
  • TPS, Visa U o Visa T
  • Estado de DACA o renovación de DACA
  • Estado Especial de Inmigrante Juvenil
  • Ley de Violencia Contra la Mujer (VAWA)
  • Inmigrantes que ya tienen Residencia Permanente

Comuníquese con Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy para hablar con alguien sobre sus opciones.

  • Línea en español 800-247-1931
  • charlottelegaladvocacy.org

Action Alert: New HUD Proposal Would Roll-Back Fair Housing Protections, Enable Discrimination

Joint statement with the N.C. Justice Center

This week, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development released a notice of proposed rulemaking to substantially change its existing rule on “Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH),” an important civil rights regulation implementing the Fair Housing Act.

The NC Justice Center (NCJC) and Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy (CCLA), based on our initial review of the new draft rule, have substantial concerns and believe it will weaken enforcement of fair housing laws as well as the ability for residents to challenge housing discrimination and racial and ethnic segregation here in North Carolina.

HUD’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) mandate was designed to correct discriminatory housing practices as well as the lasting impacts of government and privately sponsored residential segregation. Under the prior AFFH rule, jurisdictions and Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) that receive federal funding must analyze patterns of segregation and discriminatory housing practices for families with children, people of color, people with disabilities and members of other protected classes. They are also required to take actions to address barriers to fair housing. 

HUD’s proposed new rule is a step backwards in three specific areas:

  • First, unlike the prior AFFH rule issued in 2015, HUD’s proposed new rule does not even mention the need to address the negative effects of historic patterns of segregation. Instead, it only focuses on income without consideration of all the other barriers to affordable housing.
  • Second, HUD’s new rule will eliminate the community participation and engagement requirement that provides opportunities for members of local communities to have a say in the AFFH process.
  • Third, the draft new rule will no longer require jurisdictions to determine what barriers to fair housing exist in their areas, instead merely allowing them to determine their own fair housing goals. Public housing authorities, which serve thousands of North Carolinians and can play a crucial role in either reinforcing segregation or promoting integration and improving life opportunities, will no longer have substantive obligations under this draft rule.

As currently written, the proposed rule will undermine state and local efforts in North Carolina to address systemic and unfair racial disparities in housing, as well as the persistent patterns of racial segregation that continue to create unfair and unjust life outcomes for people and communities of color in our state.

A note from Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy about this proposal:

U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Ben Carson was in Charlotte this week to announce a proposed rule change that would effectively roll back fair housing protections against discrimination and segregation.

His choice to make this announcement in Charlotte is an irony not lost on Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy. We work with local partners every day to address the systemic inequities that have contributed to the lack of economic mobility in our community as well as the affordable housing crisis.

In 2013, the Equality of Opportunity study ranked Charlotte last in upward mobility among the 50 largest cities in the U.S. Since then, our community has agreed that issues of access, equity and economic opportunity are systemic problems. We must address these problems to ensure ALL in our community have a fair shot at achieving their greatest potential, regardless of income, background, race or zip code.

This rule would permanently weaken enforcement of fair housing laws. Instead of ensuring fair access to housing that is affordable, safe and habitable, this rule would perpetuate the legacy of discrimination and segregation that has shaped the community we live in today. 

This legacy is systemic. When the federal government chooses to ignore its role in that legacy, the opportunity to remedy past wrongs and adequately build a community that is equitable for all its residents is lost.

As an advocate for low-income and marginalized people, Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy believes our community deserves better. Join us in opposing this rule and help us protect fair access to housing.

What you can do

Use Your Voice

Submit your comment on this proposal during the 60-day public comment period. Tell the federal government that our community believes in access to housing for all people. 

Share this message with your networks.

Encourage others to submit comments against this rule by March 16.

Learn more about national efforts to preserve fair housing and civil rights protections.

Media Links

“US Housing Chief Unveils Plan to Roll Back Fair Housing Rule” WFAE

“US Housing Secretary Ben Carson in Charlotte to focus on affordable housing” WCNC

“Ben Carson touts relaxed fair housing rule in Charlotte. Critics call it ‘dangerous’” Charlotte Observer