COVID-19 Updates: Home Preservation

Home Preservation

Rent and Utility Assistance: Charlotte City Council recently approved an additional $8 million dollars of CARE’s Act funding to allow the expansion of the current Rent and Mortgage Assistance Program (RAMP Charlotte). This program includes rent and utility relief for tenants, long-term hotel guests, homeowners with mortgages, and hotel and property managers. Individuals who earn 80 percent or below the Area Media Income (AMI) who face a COVID-19 hardship and cannot make housing payments can apply for rent or mortgage assistance.

The Housing Opportunities and Prevention of Evictions (HOPE) Program is a new statewide initiative that may provide rent and utility assistance to eligible low- and moderate-income renters experiencing financial hardship due to the economic effects of COVID-19. HOPE will provide rent and utility assistance for renters that:

  • Have been affected by the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic
  • Have a household income that is 80% of the area median income or lower
  • Occupy the rental property as their primary home, and
  • Are behind on their rent or utilities when they apply.

Read more and apply here.

HOMES Property Tax Assistance: Need assistance with paying your property tax? The Charlotte-Mecklenburg HOMES program reduces the total amount of taxes due for a qualifying recipient’s primary residence. The amount granted will be equal to up to 25% of the Mecklenburg County tax amount on the last available tax bill, rounded to the nearest dollar, not to exceed $440. To learn more about eligibility and how to apply, click here.

General Evictions: (September 10th) Evictions proceedings can and are taking place in Mecklenburg county. However, the federal government, through the Center for Disease Control, has announced a temporary halt on evictions through December 31, 2020 to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. Under the order, landlords and property owners are prohibited from evicting certain tenants impacted by COVID-19. Learn more about the order and qualifications here.

Additionally, according to Gov. Cooper’s executive order, your landlord is required to give you six months to pay rent owed between May 30th and June 20th, 2020. During the six-month period, your landlord cannot move to evict you based on non-payment of the June rent. This does not prevent the landlord to for moving to evict a tenant for a reason other than non-payment. Additionally, a landlord may be able to evict a tenant for rent that is owed prior to May 30th.

The Order’s evictions moratorium:

  • Would prevent landlords from initiating summary ejections or other eviction proceedings against a tenant for nonpayment or late payment of rent;
  • Prevents landlords from assessing late fees or other penalties for late or nonpayment;
  • Prevents the accumulation of additional interest, fees, or other penalties for existing late fees while this Order is in effect;
  • Requires landlords to give tenants a minimum of six months to pay outstanding rent;
  • Requires leases to be modified to disallow evicting tenants for reasons of late or nonpayments; and
  • Makes clear that evictions for reasons related to health and safety can take place.

Utilities: (July 30th) Gov. Cooper’s moratorium on utility shutoffs ended July 29th, 2020. Some utility companies can now begin the process to shut off your utilities (water, gas, and electric) for non-payment. Phone and internet access were not included in the moratorium against utility shut offs.

Gov. Cooper’s utility shutoff moratorium still:

  • Prohibits billing or collection of late fees, penalties, and other charges for failure to pay for utility bills owed from March 31st to July 29th, 2020; and
  • Extends repayment plans at least six months, and sets the default term for repayment to six months for cases when the utility and customer cannot agree on the terms of an extended repayment plan.

Read more about the Gov. Cooper’s moratorium on utility shutoffs.

However, the NC Utility Commission has ordered all utility companies under its jurisdiction to not resume disconnections before September 1st, 2020. This effectively extends the moratorium on utility shut offs for one month for some, but not all, companies and NC residents. This order also extends the grace period for repayment of utilities owed from six to twelve months, doubling Gov. Cooper’s order. This includes utility providers such as Duke Energy and Piedmont Natural Gas but does not include municipal or county systems.

Click here for a list of utility providers under the NC Utility Commission’s jurisdiction. Read more about the NC Utility Commission’s extension.

Evictions from hotels/motels: (April 3) N.C. Attorney General Josh Stein is protecting residents who live in hotels or motels as their primary residence from being evicted by reminding businesses that they need to follow the law by not allowing self-help remedies such as changing the locks in order to evict a tenant. New eviction proceedings are on hold in N.C. courts (see below). Stein reminded businesses that trying to evict guests without a court order is a violation of N.C. landlord-tenant and consumer protection laws.

Read more

Eviction and Foreclosure in N.C. Courts: From the Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Mecklenburg County: “Given ongoing concerns about COVID-19, a soft reopening of Mecklenburg County Courts will begin on June 1, 2020.  Mecklenburg County Courts will employ a phased-in-approach in which courtroom operations will expand based on priorities set forth by Chief Justice Beasley.

Mecklenburg has recently started to conduct foreclosure hearings:

  • If your loan is federally-backed, you should contact the attorney handling the foreclosure and tell them about the foreclosure protection through August 31, 2020.  Plan to attend the hearing unless you are told it is being continued.
  • If you have requested a Forbearance and get a hearing notice, contact the foreclosure attorney and let them know and tell the Court hearing officer that you have a forbearance.
  • If you have health issues, contact the Court and the attorney handling the foreclosure right away about continuing the hearing.  You cannot enter the Courthouse with any COVID-related symptoms. 
  • Wear a mask and check requirements of entering courthouse here:  Mecklenburg Courthouse Modified Operations
  • Contact CCLA Consumer Protection Program with questions or concerns at 704-376-1600.

What to Know about Mortgages and Mortgage Relief: (July 15th)

Pay Your Mortgage if You Can Afford It

  • Payments skipped will still become due.  Depending upon your mortgage, you may not be happy with the repayment options offered; in some cases you may have to pay a large lump sum.  Also, mortgage companies will make a mistake when processing repayment plans – these errors can be very difficult to fix.

If you Cannot Pay your Mortgage, there may be relief available 

  • Not all mortgages qualify for the same payment relief.  See below.
  • Requesting a Forbearance is better than letting your loan go into default.  Once in default, other fees begin to accumulate on the account.
  • Under federal law, the foreclosure process cannot start until you are more than 120 days past due.  COVID forbearances/moratoriums may extend that time for certain mortgages. 

“Federally-backed” mortgages have certain rights under the federal CARES Act

What Loans Are Federally Backed?

  • FHA/HUD mortgages and HECM Reverse Mortgages
    • For FHA loans, that  may be indicated on your mortgage statement. Or, check the first page of your closing documents from when you bought the house (HUD-1 statement).
  • VA (Veteran’s Administration) mortgages
  • Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac backed mortgages
  • USDA (Department of Agriculture)
  • A list of federal loan agencies, their policies, and contact information is here

What rights do homeowners with “federally-backed” mortgages have?

  • First, your lender or loan servicer may not foreclose on you until at least August 31, 2020. The CARES Act and guidance from Fannie/Freddie, FHA, VA, and USDA, prohibit mortgage companies from beginning a foreclosure, or from finalizing a foreclosure judgment or sale. This protection began on March 18, 2020, and extends through at least December 31, 2020. CFPB link
  • Federally-backed mortgage companies must provide a Forbearance, if requested, due to financial hardship experienced during the COVID-19 emergency period.  You should not have to provide additional documents other than the request affirming your hardship.
  • Forbearance plans provide borrowers with payment relief for up to 12-months and suspend borrower late charges and penalties. It also suspends reporting to credit bureaus of past due payments of borrowers who are in a forbearance plan as a result of COVID-19 hardships..
  • You are eligible even if your loan was delinquent before the COVID emergency. If you have experienced a hardship during the COVID emergency, the forbearance should be granted once requested.
  • All forbearance payments will have to be paid back.  Do not ask for one if you do not need one.
  • A forbearance must be granted up to 180 days.  Then a borrower can request another 180 days.

Additional assistance available to homeowners with “federally backed” mortgages:

  • Through its Disaster Response Network, Fannie Mae also offers additional help to homeowners with a Fannie Mae-owned mortgage,, including:
    • A needs assessment and personalized recovery plan;
    • Help requesting financial relief from insurance, servicers, and other sources; and
    • Web resources and ongoing guidance from experienced disaster relief advisors
  • Homeowners can find out if they have a Fannie Mae-owned mortgage and access to the Disaster Response Network here.
  • Homeowners can contact Fannie Mae directly at 1-800-2FANNIE (1-800-232-6643). Get more information about your options.

What if I don’t have a federally-backed mortgage but still have a financial hardship?

  • Contact your mortgage company as soon as possible.  Many private mortgage companies are also granting forbearances.  Try by phone, or on the online website if you cannot get through.
  • Make sure you ask about and understand the repayment options at the end of the forbearance.  Ask that it be sent to you in writing.
  • Ask for assistance in writing about the repayment and loss mitigation options available to you if you do not have a federally-backed mortgage.
  • Contact a free HUD-housing Counselor.  Never pay up front for mortgage assistance.  Make sure any housing counselor is HUD-certified here:  HUD free counselors and info

What about property taxes and homeowner’s insurance?

  • If your account is escrowed (meaning the taxes and insurance are paid through your mortgage payment, the mortgage company should continue to pay them during the forbearance.
  • Borrowers who do not have an escrow account should continue to pay their property taxes, insurance, HOA fees, and other home-related items directly, if possible.

Problems with COVID Forbearances or other mortgage company issues

  • Borrowers who believe they have been improperly denied a forbearance or have other problems with their servicer should submit a complaint to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau using its complaint portal.
  • Borrower’s whose mortgage companies are regulated by the North Carolina Commissioner of Banks can file a complaint here NCCOB complaint

Other Resources:

NCLC Coronavirus:  What Borrowers Need to Know

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau:  CFPB Covid Mortgage Info

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COVID-19 Updates: Community Stability

Community Stability

Updates from the City of Charlotte

U.S. Census: The U.S. Census count is still underway though the U.S. Census Bureau has adjusted 2020 Census operations to accommodate participation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Changes include:

  • Self-Response deadline (online, mail, phone) has been moved to October 15.
  • Door-to-door counts by Census workers has ended.

Respondents are urged to respond to the count online if possible.

Jury trials in Mecklenburg County will resume the week of November 16th. You should have received updated court dates or jury summons if applicable to your situation. (October 21)

N.C. Courts delay cases, will reopen June 1, 2020: (May 21) Chief Justice Cheri Beasley issues an order outlining how courts will expand operations after June 1 and new procedures that will go into effect. Read the order.

(May 20) From the Office of the Clerk of Superior Court, Mecklenburg County: “Given ongoing concerns about COVID-19, a soft reopening of Mecklenburg County Courts will begin on June 1, 2020.  Mecklenburg County Courts will employ a phased-approach in which courtroom operations will expand based on priorities set forth by Chief Justice Beasley.

Mecklenburg County Courts will implement safety protocols to restrict the number of courts operating and the number of occupants in the courtrooms.  Such protocols are necessary to ensure the safety of court personnel, court partners and the public.

Court docket sizes will be significantly reduced and Court partners and litigants should expect some delay in the scheduling of court matters.”

(April 3) N.C. Chief Justice Cherie Beasley issued an order postponing court cases to June 1.

Exceptions include:

  • Domestic violence hearings for protective orders
  • If the proceeding can be conducted remotely
  • Cases where there is a constitutional or statutory right to an immediate hearing.

Read the full order here

(March 16) North Carolina Supreme Court Chief Justice Cherie Beasley directed local courts to postpone most cases in district and superior court for at least 30 days beginning March 17, 2020. Exceptions include:

  • Domestic violence hearings for protective orders
  • Cases with trials already in progress
  • Cases where there is a constitutional or statutory right to an immediate hearing.

Read more.

Updated Mecklenburg County Courthouse Operations Schedule: (March 26) English Español

CATS Service: (March 25) CATS will make modifications to transit service to accommodate the current demand. By operating modified service, CATS will continue providing the community access to essential daily needs, front-line jobs and medical services. All service will be FREE during this time.  These changes are effective until further notice. Read more.

Unemployment Insurance Executive Order: (March 17) N.C. Governor Roy Cooper issued an executive order to expand unemployment benefits for workers impacted by COVID-19. The order lifts some restrictions on unemployment benefits to help workers unemployed due to COVID-19 and those who are employed but will not receive a paycheck. Additionally, it adds benefit eligibility for those out of work because they have the virus or must care for someone who is sick.

For example, workers who lose income due to tips or scheduled work hours, but are still employed, would be eligible for benefits because of this Executive Order. Among other changes:

  • It removes the one-week waiting period to apply for unemployment payment for those workers who lose their jobs;
  • It removes the requirement that a person must be actively looking for another job during this time when many potential employers are closed and social distancing guidelines are in effect.
  • It allows employees who lose their jobs or, in certain cases have their hours reduced due to Covid-19 to apply for unemployment benefits.
  • It directs that employers will not be held responsible for benefits paid as a direct result of these COVID-19 claims.
  • It waives the requirement that people must apply for benefits in person; workers can apply for benefits online or by phone.

Read more.

Public utilities, internet service will remain available to some customers: (July 29) The N.C. Utilities Commission put out an order suspending service disconnections during COVID-19 outbreak until September 1st, 2020 to ensure residents maintain access to water, power and gas. Click here to read more.

Mecklenburg Clerk of Court Adjusts Hours: (March 16) The Mecklenburg County Clerk of Superior Court’s Office will reduce hours of operation and staff availability. They will be open to the public Monday through Friday, between 9 am and noon. This scheduled change will be in effect for at least the next 30 days. Read more.

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COVID-19 Updates: Healthcare Access and Public Benefits

Healthcare Access and Public Benefits

From our Family Support & Health Care team: Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy’s Family Support and Health Care team is working to ensure family stability through fair access to vital healthcare and public services during this period of uncertainty.

We are particularly focused on the most vulnerable groups in our community who often do not have access to these services: children, seniors, people living with disabilities, immigrants and their families. Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy is monitoring the situation to make sure residents continue to have uninterrupted access to benefits and healthcare during the COVID-19 outbreak. Anyone experiencing issues should contact us by calling 704-376-1600.

Health Insurance Navigator Services still available by phone: The Advocacy Center’s Health Insurance Navigators are still available for phone appointments to help consumers understand their health coverage options and assist them with the following:

  • Marketplace applications (Affordable Care Act)
  • Medicaid applications
  • Food Stamp (SNAP) applications
  • Marketplace appeals
  • Medicaid denials/terminations
  • Issues accessing care through private insurance or Medicaid

Navigators can help people complete their applications online by phone.

To schedule a FREE appointment:

  • go online to ncnavigator.net, Local navigator appointments are available online under zip code 28204 listed as “Phone Appointment with Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy.”
  • call the statewide appointments hotline 1-855-733-3711,
  • call our new Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy Navigator direct line at 980-256-3782.

Navigators are also available to assist clients needing to communicate with Mecklenburg County DSS, specifically with the Office of Consumer Advocacy, to help them address with any barriers they may be experiencing regarding access to healthcare or food stamps.

Qualifying for Health Insurance through Special Enrollment Periods during COVID-19: As a reminder, many individuals may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) to enroll in Marketplace health coverage outside of Open Enrollment if they have had recently experienced any of the following: marriage, permanent move, changes in immigration status, release from incarceration, adding a family member (birth, adoption, placement for foster care), increase income (from below 100% to over 100% of the Federal Poverty Level), and loss of coverage,

SEPs are generally life changes that affect your access to health coverage and enrollment must be done within 60 days of the change. However, due to COVID-19, the enrollment period has been expanded to include anyone who has experienced any of the above life changing events since January 1st, 2020. If you lost your employment and healthcare coverage from any time beginning January 1st, 2020, you are eligible to enroll in Marketplace health coverage even if the initial 60 day SEP has passed. Read more.

Individuals interested in applying for Medicaid can do so all year around and do not need an SEP.

While our government and healthcare systems are expanding access to testing for the uninsured, enrollment in a Marketplace plan can cover any additional associated costs such as a hospitalization and provide peace of mind for consumers during this tense time.

Access to Medicaid during COVID-19: (April 1)

  • During the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency, states must NOT terminate Medicaid eligibility except for:
    • if the beneficiary moves out of the state.
    • if the beneficiary voluntarily requests termination of Medicaid benefits.
  • North Carolina County Departments of Social Services must accept self-attestation for all eligibility criteria except citizenship and immigration status, when documentation and/or electronic sources are not available.
  • Individuals who must pay an enrollment fee for NC Health Choice or an enrollment fee and/or premium for Health Care for Workers with Disabilities (HCWD) will be exempt from that requirement until further notice.

N.C. Medicaid Program expands access to telemedicine: (March 23) Medicaid is temporarily modifying its Telemedicine and Telepsychiatry Clinical Coverage Policies to better enable the delivery of remote care to Medicaid beneficiaries. In addition to telephone conversations and secure electronic messaging, the modifications will include the use of two-way real-time interactive audio and video to provide and support physical and behavioral health care when participants are in different physical locations. Read more.

N.C. requests waivers for Medicaid program: (March 23)

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved NC’s 1135 waiver request to allow for more flexibility in providing healthcare access, such as:

  • providing services in alternative settings;
  • extending the amount of time individuals have to request a Medicaid fair hearing for fee-for-service eligibility and service appeal requests;
  • temporarily suspending prior authorization requirements for medically necessary services provided through the fee-for-service delivery system, and
  • faster application and enrollment processes for health care professionals to provide care to Medicaid beneficiaries.

Read more about the waivers here and here.

(March 18) The N.C. Department of Health and Human Services has requested waivers from the federal government to ensure uninterrupted services for the state’s Medicaid beneficiaries. The waiver request includes measure to:

– streamline the enrollment process

– waive limits on access to hospital beds and lengths of stay in the hospital

– waive restrictions to expand alternatives to institutionalized care, such as in-home care services

Read more.

Access to healthcare for immigrants and their families: (March 18)

According to the National Immigration Law Center, our national partner:

  • The Families First Act provides additional funding to pay for coronavirus testing for anyone who is uninsured. The funding will pay for testing at community health centers, outpatient clinics, and doctors’ offices.
  • Immigrants can continue to access services at community health centers, regardless of their immigration status, and at a reduced cost or free of charge depending on their income. However, people should call first to find out the availability of COVID-19 screening and testing. Health centers may do patient assessments over the phone or using telehealth.
  • Eligibility for Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplaces has not changed.
  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) recently posted an alert clarifying that it will not consider testing, treatment, or preventive care (including vaccines if a vaccine becomes available) related to COVID-19 in a public charge inadmissibility determination, even if the health care services are covered by Medicaid.

Learn more from NILC.

Changes to N.C. food stamp certification periods: (March 18) The N.C. Office Economic and Family Services announced plans to extend the state’s Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) certification periods for all cases that have certification periods ending March 31 or April 30, 2020, with the exception of Simplified Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP or food stamp) cases. Automatic extension will alleviate the need for FNS households to leave their homes to mail or deliver their re-certification forms or to retrieve required verification, reducing potential exposure to COVID-19.

Mecklenburg County DSS offices closed to the public: (March 17) Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy just learned that Mecklenburg County is closing its Department of Social Services (DSS) offices to the public as of tomorrow, March 18, and will be conducting all business via telephone and mail.

At Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy’s urging, DSS has agreed to honor the date of phone calls as date of application for applicants, to not terminate benefits missed deadlines, to allow late appeals, and to post clear signage in front of their buildings outlining this information.

Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy is monitoring the situation to make sure residents continue to have uninterrupted access to benefits during the COVID-19 outbreak. Anyone experiencing issues should contact us by calling 704-376-1600.

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COVID-19 Updates: Immigration

Immigration

From our Immigrant Justice Team: Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy is open through the COVID-19 crisis and will continue to accept new immigration cases for representation.  Our focus continues to be on Special Immigrant Juvenile Status and asylum cases, but we will consider other categories of immigration relief on a case-by-case basis.  Please call 800-247-1931 to determine whether we can assist you. 

Here is what we know about how the COVID-19 crisis will affect immigration matters in the near future:

Charlotte’s immigration court open in a limited capacity (Phase One): Unless otherwise specified, Master Calendar Hearings are postponed through, and including, December 4th, 2020. Non-detainee hearings resumed on September 14, 2020 in Charlotte’s immigration court.

Phases of Immigration court opening: We are in phase 1.  

Phase 1 – individual hearings only in some of the courtrooms- (September 14, 2020 )

Phase 2 – individual hearings only in all courtrooms 

Phase 3 – masters and individual hearings 

The Executive Office for Immigration Reviews has announced that the 800 toll-free number that individuals can normally can call to check for hearing information may not be updated and should not be relied upon.  The Advocacy Center is monitoring this situation and will update this page as soon as information becomes available.

ICE Check-Ins: (March 19) Individuals with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) check-ins should be contacted by an ICE officer to check in by phone—instead of in person—on their next scheduled report date.  The phone number to call for the Charlotte Enforcement and Removal Office is 843-746-2857.

USCIS Field Offices: (July 30) USCIS since June 4, 2020, resumed non-emergency face-to-face services to the public USCIS has enacted precautions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in reopened facilities. Appointment notices will include further instructions for visiting USCIS facilities. USCIS locations are not accepting walk-in visits at this time. 

The Charlotte Field Office will send notices to applicants and petitions with scheduled appointments and naturalization ceremonies impacted by the closure.  USCIS asylum offices will send interview cancellation notices and automatically reschedule asylum interviews.  USCIS will provide emergency services for limited situations.  To schedule an emergency appointment, individuals should contact the USCIS Contact CenterRead more.

El Centro de apoyo estará abierto durante la crisis de COVID-19 y seguirá aceptando nuevos casos de inmigración que requieran de representación. Nuestro enfoque seguirá siendo casos de Estatus de Inmigrante Juvenil Especial y casos de asilo, pero consideraremos otros tipos de casos inmigratorios dependiendo de cada caso.  Por favor llame a la línea de español ( 800-247-1931) para determinar si le podemos ayudar.

Esto es lo que sabemos sobre cómo la crisis del COVID-19 afectará asuntos de inmigración en el futuro cercano:

La corte de inmigración de Charlotte está abierta a una capacidad limitada (Fase uno): A menos que se especifique lo contrario, Master Calender (MCH) se pospuestas hasta el 4 de diciembre de 2020. Las audiencias de no detenidos se reanudarán el 14 de septiembre de 2020 en la corte de inmigración de Charlotte.

Fases de la apertura de la corte de inmigraciónEstamos en la fase 1.

Fase 1: audiencias individuales solo en algunas de las salas de audiencias (a partir del 14 de septiembre de 2020)

Fase 2: audiencias individuales en todas las salas de audiencias

Fase 3 – master calender y audiencias individuales

La Oficina Ejecutiva de Revisión de Casos de Inmigración ha anunciado que el número gratuito, al que normalmente puede llamar para averiguar información sobre su próxima audiencia, no va a estar actualizado y no debe confiar en la información que le dé. El centro de apoyo legal está monitoreando esta situación y vamos a actualizar esta página una vez la información correcta esté disponible.

Si tiene que registrarse con Immigration and Customs Enforcement (“ICE”) debe ser contactado por un oficial de ICE para registrarse por teléfono – en vez de en persona – en su próxima fecha de reporte agendada. El número al que puede llamar para contactarse con la Oficina de Aplicación y Remoción de Charlotte es 843-746-2857.

Los Servicios de Ciudadanía e Inmigración de Estados Unidos (“USCIS”) USCIS desde el 4 de junio de 2020 reanudó los servicios cara a cara que no son de emergencia para el público. USCIS ha tomado precauciones para evitar la propagación de COVID-19 en las instalaciones reabiertas. Los avisos de citas incluirán más instrucciones para visitar las instalaciones de USCIS. Las ubicaciones de USCIS no aceptan visitas sin cita en este momento.

La oficina de USCIS en Charlotte mandará notificación a todos los solicitantes con citas programadas y ceremonias de ciudadanía impactados por el cierre. Las Oficinas de USCIS de asilo mandarán notificaciones de cancelación de entrevistas y reprogramarán automáticamente las entrevistas de asilo. USCIS proveerá servicios de emergencia para situaciones limitadas. Para programar una cita de emergencia, debe comunicarse con el Centro de Contacto de USCISLee mas

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COVID-19 Updates

Wait… what’s happening?

We are living in an unprecedented moment, trying to adjust to a situation that continues to evolve. Life in our community has completely changed in a matter of days—so much so that it’s been hard to keep track of everything that has happened.

We’re here to help.

As a champion for those in need, Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy is committed to serving our community during this pandemic and beyond. Anyone needing assistance can contact us by calling 704-376-1600 (Mecklenburg County), 800-438-1254 (Outside Meckelenburg County) or 800-247-1931 (Linea de Español).

You can find updates for how our offices are operating during COVID-19 here as well as a community resource guide for Cabarrus, Mecklenburg and Union counties.

LOOKING FOR A SPECIFIC AREA OF ASSISTANCE?

Click to these pages:

Consumer Protection

Home Preservation

Community Stability

Healthcare Access and Public Benefits

Immigration

Tax Assistance

COVID-19 Updates: Tax Assistance

Updated June 25, 2020

Tax Assistance

From our N.C. Low-Income Tax Clinic team: Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy’s North Carolina Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic is available to help taxpayers experiencing problems with the IRS, trying to understand changes to tax season and any other developments resulting from COVID-19. We are currently working all tax cases by mail and phone, while monitoring policy changes at the federal and state level. Anyone with questions can contact us by phone (704-376-1600) or online.

Need assistance with paying your property tax? The Charlotte-Mecklenburg HOMES program reduces the total amount of taxes due for a qualifying recipient’s primary residence. The amount granted will be equal to up to 25% of the Mecklenburg County tax amount on the last available tax bill, rounded to the nearest dollar, not to exceed $440. To learn more about eligibility and how to apply, click here.

IRS closes e-service help lines: (March 27) The IRS is closing its e-service help phone lines as well as help desks for filing returns electronically and Affordable Care Act information returns until further notice. The IRS is also unable to answer questions about stimulus payments currently. Taxpayers with questions can still call 1-800-829-1040 to get tax questions answered between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. local time.

This announcement does not affect taxpayers’ ability to file their taxes by mail or online, and collections from the IRS are still mostly suspended.

IRS announces People First Initiative: (March 25) The IRS announced it will be adjusting procedures to “ease the burden on people facing tax issues” during the COVID-19 outbreak. These new changes include issues ranging from postponing certain payments related to Installment Agreements and Offers in Compromise to collection and limiting certain enforcement actions. The IRS will be temporarily modifying procedures as soon as possible; the projected start date will be April 1, and the effort will initially run through July 15. During this period, to the maximum extent possible, the IRS will avoid in-person contacts. However, the IRS will continue to take steps where necessary to protect all applicable statutes of limitations. Read more.

Tax Day deadline pushed back 90 days to July 15 for Federal and State Taxes: (March 20) The U.S. Treasury has moved the deadline to file federal income taxes from April 15 to July 15. Now taxpayers have until July 15 to file and pay.

North Carolina has since announced that it will also move its deadline to July 15. However, due to the state’s tax statute, people who do not pay their taxes by April 15 will begin to accrue interest on their taxes. This interest will not apply if taxpayers make payments by the July 15 deadline. Read more.

Free Filing for Taxes is still available: (March 20) Taxpayers whose adjusted gross income is $69,000 or less with access to a computer, cell phone, and internet can go to the IRS Free File site, choose a third-party preparer and file their taxes for free: apps.irs.gov/app/freeFile/

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COVID-19 Updates: Consumer Protection

Consumer Protection

From our Consumer Protection team: Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy has been working with our state, local and national partners to help the most vulnerable communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Advocacy Center continues to fight for vulnerable consumers to protect them from financial exploitation. In these uncertain times, our attorneys and paralegals can help protect you and your loved ones from scammers who want to make a quick buck.

People are understandably worried about losing their jobs, income, health care and the problems that will cause with every aspect of their financial lives from their ability to pay bills to the effect the crisis will have on their health and credit.  There are several bills working their way through Congress now to provide relief to consumers. As we get new information about new consumer legislation protecting and providing for consumers, we’ll post it here.

In the meantime, be cautious when dealing with people who promise something that sounds too good to be true. Some things to watch out for:

  1. Price gouging: From bare shelves to outrageous prices for basic products, people are trying to make a quick buck from the coronavirus crisis. If you think a merchant is price gouging, report the business to the N.C. Attorney General’s office. They can investigate and shut down any scammers, if necessary.
  2. Phony cures: Scammers promise to sell you a product or service that will prevent or cure the coronavirus, or, offer to sell you a product they don’t have.
  3. Fake charities: Say they will donate to affected communities, but will pocket the money instead.
  4. Door-to-door sales: Be cautious of anyone who comes to your door offering to sell you something. Don’t sign anything presented to you by someone that contacts you first. Take your time to read any paperwork and let someone else review any document before you sign it.
  5. Bogus “official communications” emails from government agencies: These emails could say they are from federal and state governments, Center for Disease Control (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO). These emails will have the look and feel of an official memo, and purport to contain “important information” or maps relating to the COVID-19 outbreak, in an attachment; or other calls to action that involve opening a file or clicking on a link.  Instead, the files or links lead to key-loggers, bogus web sites that try to capture personal information, or ransomware.
  6. “Coronavirus Tracker” Apps: These appear as an ad or link for a free download of a mobile app that claims to provide real-time updates of COVID-19 outbreaks, mapped against your location.  But instead of an app, the download contains a ransomware payload.

And, remember, if you fall behind on your mortgage, rent or other bills, there may be some relief available to you. To learn more, view our Home Preservation updates page. Contact Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy’s Consumer Protection Program if you think you are being taken advantage of or need information about a consumer matter.

Student Loan Payments Deferred:  (August 24) The Trump administration announced that student loan payments can be paused until December 31st, 2020 with no accrued interest if the borrower will call and make a request from their loan servicer. Those who still want to make their payments can do so. These payments would apply directly to the principal balance, which may allow some borrowers to pay off their loan more quickly. Read more.

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