North Carolina Extra Credit Grants: FAQs

In early September, the North Carolina legislature passed a coronavirus relief act providing for $335 Extra Credit Grant payments to North Carolina residents meant to offset the costs of virtual learning for their children during the pandemic. According to the act, most North Carolina households with children will automatically receive checks for $335 from the state this fall if they filed a state tax return by the October 15 deadline and met the other program eligibility requirements. Checks are in the process of being mailed and should be received on or before December 15.

Other individuals who were not required to file a state tax return had until October 15 to visit the North Carolina Department of Revenue website and complete an online Extra Credit Grant application or print and mail the application to the North Carolina Department of Revenue.

Application Deadline for Extra Credit Grant Extended for Some Low-Income Families

As the result of litigation brought by Robinson Bradshaw on behalf of Legal Aid of North Carolina, the Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy and several low-income families, on November 6, 2020, a court entered an order that reopened and extended the application period for eligible individuals to apply for the $335 Extra Credit Grant. These individuals may apply for the grant through December 7, 2020. The system to apply for $335 Extra Credit Grant can be found at 335forNC.com 

Logo for 335forNC

Eligibility Requirements

  • An applicant must not have filed a 2019 state tax return solely because the individual’s gross income for the 2019 taxable year did not exceed the state filing requirements for the individual’s filing status (generally $10,000 per year if single and $20,000 per year if married).
  • An applicant must have met the all other requirements referenced in the law, including having at least one qualifying child age 16 or under for the 2019 calendar year and have been a North Carolina resident for all of the 2019 calendar year.  

Here are answers to frequently asked questions regarding the payments:

My spouse and I live together, can we each receive a $335 payment?

No. The grant is limited to one check for each household.

When will I receive my $335 payment?

The North Carolina Department of Revenue will send $335 Extra Credit Grants to all eligible applicants as soon as possible. 

Do I need to apply again if I already applied?

No. Only individuals who did not previously apply may submit an application during the extended application period. Eligible individuals who have already submitted an application will receive a check in the coming weeks.  

I am eligible for the Extra Credit Grant. How much will I receive?

If you are eligible for the Extra Credit Grant, you will receive a one-time payment of $335.

I am eligible for the Extra Credit Grant. I have two Qualifying Children. Will I receive $335 for each Qualifying Child?

No. The grant amount is $335 per eligible individual, not for each Qualifying Child. The NCDOR does not control the amount of the Extra Credit Grants.  The law provides the grant amount of $335 per eligible individual, even if the eligible individual has two or more Qualifying Children. 

I am divorced. Am I eligible to receive the Extra Credit Grant?

This determination is based on Federal law. In addition to meeting other eligibility requirements, generally, your child must be claimed by the “custodial parent” which is the parent with whom the child lived for the longer period during the year. However, the custodial parent may execute Federal Form 8332 which states that the custodial parent will not claim such credit and the noncustodial parent can attach the form and claim the child. Whichever parent or guardian has the authority to claim the child on their Federal income tax return will have the authority to claim the child on the state income tax return and would be able to receive the Extra Credit Grant.

I filed my 2019 North Carolina individual income tax return, and I reported my filing status as “married filing jointly.” Will my spouse and I each receive an Extra Credit Grant?

No. For purposes of eligibility for the ECG, spouses who filed a joint 2019 North Carolina individual income tax return are treated as one eligible individual.

I filed my 2019 North Carolina individual income tax return.  The software package I used did not report a Qualifying Child on Line 10a, even though I had a Qualifying Children for whom I was allowed a Federal Child Tax Credit on my 2019 Federal tax return. Am I eligible to receive the automatic grant award if I amend my 2019 D-400 on or before October 15, 2020, solely to correct the entry on Line 10a?

Yes, BUT the deadline to amend has passed.

My spouse is active-duty military. Are there special rules for determining if I am a resident of North Carolina?

Yes. The Servicemembers Civil Relief Act provides that a spouse shall neither lose nor acquire domicile or residence in a state when the spouse is present in the state solely to be with the servicemember in compliance with the servicemember’s military orders if the residence or domicile is the same for both the servicemember and the spouse. For additional information see the NCDOR’s website.

I did not have a 2019 North Carolina filing requirement, so how do I choose my filing status?

You must choose a filing status you would have been entitled to use if you had filed a 2019 federal income tax return.

You must select one of the following:

Married Filing Jointly. If you are married and both you and your spouse agree to a joint return, you may choose “married filing jointly” as your filing status. You may also choose this filing status if your spouse died during 2019 and you did not remarry before the end of 2019.

Married Filing Separately. If you are married, and you and your spouse do not agree to a joint return, you must choose “married filing separately” as your filing status, unless you qualify to choose “head of household” as your filing status.

Head of Household. If you meet all the following requirements, you may choose “head of household” as your fling status:

• You are unmarried or considered unmarried on the last day of 2019.

• You paid more than half of the cost of keeping up a home for 2019.

• A qualifying person lived with you in the home for more than half of 2019 (except for temporary absences, such as school).

Qualifying Widower/Surviving Spouse. If you meet all the following requirements, you may choose “qualifying widower/surviving spouse” as your fling status:

• You were entitled to file a joint return with your spouse for the year your spouse died.

• Your spouse died in 2017 or 2018 and you didn’t remarry before the end of 2019.

• You have a child or stepchild (not a foster child) whom you can claim as a dependent or could claim as a dependent except that, for 2019:

a. The child had gross income of $4,200 or more,

b. The child filed a joint return, or

c. You could be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s return.

• The child lived in your home the entire 2019 calendar year, except for temporary absences, such as school.

• You paid more than half the cost of keeping up a home for the year.

Single. If you are unmarried or considered unmarried and you do not qualify for another filing status, you must choose “single” as your filing status.

If you need help determining which filing status you should choose or who is a considered a “qualifying child” for purposes of your 2019 filing status, see IRS Publication 17, Tax Guide 2019 or IRS Publication 501 for 2019.

How do I calculate my “gross income”?

To calculate your 2019 gross income, total all of items of income you (and your spouse, when applicable) received in 2019. Items of income include all money, goods, property, and services received during 2019, unless the item of income is exempt from tax. (For more information on what types of income are taxable, see IRS Publication 17, Tax Guide for 2019.)

Include part of your social security benefits in gross income if:

• You were married, filing a separate return, and you lived with your spouse at any time during 2019; or

• Half of your social security benefits plus your other gross income and any tax-exempt interest is more than $25,000 ($32,000 if married filing jointly).

If either (1) or (2) applies, see the Instructions for Forms 1040 and 1040-SR or Publication 915, Social Security and Equivalent Railroad Retirement Benefits, to figure the social security benefits you must include in gross income.

How do I get help?

If you have not already applied for an Extra Credit Grant and are eligible, applications are now available until December 7th. For more information and to apply visit 335forNC.com.

Additional details about eligibility can be found on NCDOR’s Extra Credit Grant FAQ page.

Looking Toward a New Administration

Friends,

This has been an unparalleled election season for many reasons, among them occurring during a global pandemic and national protests for racial justice. We now know the outcome of our national and state elections. Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy applauds those who have fought so fiercely to protect the democratic process, register others to vote, and cast their own ballot. Despite numerous obstacles, North Carolinians voted early and by-mail in record numbers yielding this historic administration. Kamala Harris is the first Black woman and first person of Indian descent to be elected to national office—an incredible achievement for Harris and the United States as a whole. This is a historic end to an historic year.  

Now, more than ever, our country needs strong leadership to overcome the socio-economic consequences of this pandemic. We hope that the Biden administration will implement policies that expand services and protections to low-income families and all United States residents during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Among these issues include universal healthcare, raising the federal minimum wage, ensuring the availability of asylum relief for immigrants, and expanding access to our legal system. 

The Advocacy Center also acknowledges the important role of the state legislature in passing policies that impact our community and our clients. Here are a few key issues affecting North Carolinians that our organization encourages the state legislature to pass and for our community to support: 

  • Medicaid Expansion: Access to affordable care is critical during the COVID-19 crisis. North Carolina is just one of twelve states not to have expanded Medicaid eligibility so that all state residents have affordable healthcare options. Without Medicaid expansion, it is estimated that over 500,000 people fall into the coverage gap—even more since the start of the pandemic. Learn more about the coverage gap here
  • Fixing our broken unemployment insurance system: Over one million North Carolinians have applied for unemployment benefits since March. The overwhelming volume of applications paired with implementing new assistance programs has caused significant delays, making the process more confusing for applicants. These funds are critical to families trying to recover from this pandemic. 
  • Expanding food assistance programs: The Pandemic Electronic Benefit Transfer program expanded food assistance for North Carolinian families during this pandemic. Families receiving SNAP benefits (food stamps) have been receiving the maximum eligible benefits through October 2020. To ensure individuals can feed their families, these programs and expansions must continue without work requirements. 
  • State funded rent and mortgage relief: The CDC Eviction Moratorium expires on December 31st, 2020 with no adequate plan to keep all North Carolinians safely housed. The state legislature must act quickly to increase program funding for rent and mortgage relief by allocating nearly 1.5 billion unreserved dollars toward assistance for families affected by COVID-19.  

While these issues have a distinct urgency during the COVID-19 pandemic, they are also necessary social safety nets beyond this global crisis. As federal and state protections expire, programs must be implemented to ensure there is support for all North Carolinian families to endure this pandemic and put our state on the road toward economic recovery. 

While we celebrate the incredible work of activists, voters, and elected officials across the country, the fight for safety, security and stability in our society continues. Call your state and federal representatives regularly to show your support of low-income North Carolinian families and pandemic relief efforts. Volunteer with community organizations, exercise your constitutional right to protest and petition, and practice empathy and compassion. Our community’s influence does not end after we cast our ballot: looking beyond electoral politics is integral to lasting change. 

This year has certainly presented challenges to our communities, but Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy will continue to serve and affirm low-income families, Black, Indigenous, and other people of color, women, LGBTQ+ individuals, veterans, disabled people, and immigrants. We strongly believe that diversity of life and experience is what makes our country great and we will persist in fighting for access to justice for all people. Our vision is to build a just community, where all people are treated fairly, which does not, and will never, end after an election. 

Sincerely, 

The staff at Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy 

2021 Access to Justice Champions

We are grateful for those who are leading the way to fund our COVID-19 effort to ensure safety, stability, and security for all during these uncertain times. Your support enables us to continue this important work and adapt to meet our community’s needs. Despite the challenges that this year has placed upon us, we know we can count on you.

These donors have contributed at the leadership level of $1,000 or more to the 2021 Access to Justice Campaign benefiting Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy and Legal Aid of North Carolina and bringing us even closer to our $500,000 goal.

Mecklenburg Access to Justice Champions sticker

John Mitchell and Linda MacDonald Aberman

John A. Fagg

T. Hal Clarke

Christopher and Anne Lam

Lisa Howell

Heather and Chris Culp

Paul R. Kinny

Mary Mandeville and Kirk Keever

Heloise C. Merrill

Bank of America Corporation

David Sobul

Jason and Jennifer Schubert

Altson & Bird

Brian Hayles

David and Lyn Batty

Julian and Amy Wright

Robert and Christy Hancock

Brett and Julie A. Durham

Christine and Trevor Hoke

Stephen Luke Largess

John and Meredith Jeffries

Emily Kern and Mark Metz

Robert L. Mendenhall

D. Blaine and Ann Morgan Sanders

Sean and Jacqueline Jones 

Douglas W. and Tere Ey

Steven N. Cohen

Corby and James William Anderson

Mark Gosnell

Katten Muchin Rosenman

Leslee Daugherty and Roger Gilmartin

Kevin and Elizabeth Murphy

Nelson Mullins

John N. Suhr

Lisa and Ken L. Miller

Cory and Katherine Hohnbaum

Bradley

Timika Shafeek-Horton

Keith F. Oberkfell

L. Cameron Caudle

Lincoln Derr

Mark Busch

W. Scott and Sharon Dove

Jessica and Burgin Hardin

J. Michael Booe and Rebecca Henderson

Jonathan P. Goldberg

Luther T. Moore

Ben Pleune

Tin, Fulton, Walker & Owen, PLLC

W. Todd & Debbie Stillerman

*Donors as of November 9th, 2020*

Want to become an Access to Justice Champion? Make a contribution to be recognized as a leader of our COVID-19 effort.

Find out how.

The 2020 Election

Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy logo

Friends,

The 2020 election has been certainly unprecedented. Although ballots have already been cast in North Carolina and across the nation, we understand that we likely will not know the outcome of the election for days to come. Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy recognizes and is grateful to activists and organizations that have mobilized the American public to exercise their right to vote.

North Carolinians voted early and by mail in record numbers with over four and a half million people voting absentee this season. Whether you voted in person or by mail, thank you for voting and for your commitment during this election. 

While we wait to hear who the next President Elect and our state representatives will be, we hope that you and your family can take some time to rest, reflect, and regroup. Anxieties are particularly high during elections and have been worsened by the global COVID-19 pandemic. We have endured an exhausting election year. 

The fight for justice for all does not end at the ballot box. We must continue to hold our representatives accountable for the pressing needs of our communities during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. Continue to take action: 

  • Regularly contact your state and federal representatives to encourage them to pass legislation that extends pandemic relief efforts and expands social safety nets for your neighbors.  
  • Get involved and volunteer with local organizations; you can learn about volunteer opportunities at The Advocacy Center here.  
  • Support and, if you are able, join those who are working for racial equity.  

Let this election become your call to action and the start, if not continuation, of your commitment to access to affordable housing, food and financial security, health insurance, and justice.

Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy will be here to serve our community regardless of election results. We continue to advocate for the safety, security and stability of low-income families, Black, Indigenous, and other people of color, women, the LGBTQ+ community, disabled people, veterans, and immigrants through civil legal aid. As the economic and legal repercussions of this pandemic unfold, The Advocacy Center will continue to adapt to meet urgent needs.

We are here, we are working, and we are listening.

Sincerely, 

The staff at Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy 

Celebrate Pro Bono Week October 25th-31st, 2020

We have to shout it from the rooftops. Our Access to Justice Pro Bono Partners Program enables Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy and Legal Aid of North Carolina–Charlotte to have an immense impact on our society, narrow Mecklenburg County’s justice gap, and to build a stronger, more just community for us all.

THANK YOU!

Locally and Nationally Recognized Volunteers and Programs

We recognized nearly 100 volunteer attorneys who donated at least 20 hours of service in the last year. From executing wills to helping immigrant children, these attorneys are dedicated to access to justice in Charlotte-Mecklenburg and beyond.

Graphic of Mecklenburg County pro bono award recipients including head shots of Paul Kinny, Emma Merrit, and Blas Arroyo
Mecklenburg Bar Pro Bono Award Recipients

Of these attorneys, several were recognized for their commitment to pro bono by the Mecklenburg Bar. Blas P. Arroyo, senior counsel at Alston & Bird LLP, and Emma Merritt, attorney with Hunton Andrews and Kurth LLP, received this accolade for their respective work on criminal record expunctions and medicaid advocacy with Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy. Paul Kinny, a long term attorney with Duke Energy, spent ten weeks assisting Legal Aid of NC–Charlotte with housing cases. Moore & Van Allen PLLC received the firm award for their dedication of over 300 hours of representation in landlord-tenant cases. Learn more about those recognized here.

Finally, the Charlotte Triage Pro Bono Partnership received two awards from the North Carolina Bar Association and the Pro Bono Institute this year for its innovative approach to engaging local attorneys with and training them in six of the most pressing legal issues affecting Mecklenburg County: human trafficking, housing, social security benefits, driver’s license restoration, criminal record expunctions, and affordable healthcare. This year we trained over 200 attorneys and advocates to volunteer with our programs through the Charlotte Triage Pro Bono Partnership.

Meet Heryka Knoespel and Elizabeth Murphy: Learn their “Why”

Sometimes the best part about being an attorney is helping people in ways they never expected. Attorney Heryka Knoespel gives a great example of this when she talks about how she helped someone not only get justice but improve his life.
Attorney Elizabeth Murphy tells us about her experience as a pro bono attorney at Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy. For Elizabeth, the support she has received from staff and the gratitude she receives from clients makes the pro bono work priceless. Watch Elizabeth explain how she used her skills to help a little girl from South America stay in the United States where she had more opportunity.

Learn more about the Access to Justice Pro Bono Partners program

Voting in 2020

Have you made your plan to vote yet?

In a historic election year, your voice deserves to be heard. Vote for #accesstojustice this fall.  Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy encourages everyone who can to vote and let their voice be heard. 

Below you can find information on how to register to vote in North Carolina, ways that you can vote in North Carolina, resources for this information, and non-partisan election volunteer opportunities.  

How to Register to Vote: 

Regular voter registration ends on October 9th, 2020. Eligible voters can register to vote three ways: 

  • BMail: Fill out the voter registration form (English) (Spanish) and mail it to your local Board of Elections office or Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) office. Click here to find your local Board of Elections office.  
  • Online: North Carolina residents who have a valid driver’s license can register to vote online on the DMV website. There is no fee associated with this service.   
  • In Person: You can register to vote in person at your local Board of Elections office, DMV, or during early voting.  

If you miss the regular voter registration deadline, you can register at your early voting polling precinct between October 15th and October 31st AND vote on the same day. You must have a document with your legal name and proof of address such as a valid NC driver’s license or other government issued identification, a recent utility bill, or a current college/university identification with proof of campus residency. Learn more about early voting registration here. Check your early voting site here.   

How to Vote: 

Registered voters in North Carolina can cast their ballot by mail (also known as absentee voting) or in-person:  

  • By Mail: You can request your absentee ballot online via the North Carolina absentee ballot request portal. You should request your ballot as soon as possible and at least two weeks prior to election day due to mail delays. After receipt of your ballot, cast your vote in the presence of a witness and return it to any of the following locations by 5pm on November 3rd: 
  • Mail it to or drop it off at your local Board of Elections office. Click here to find your local Board of Elections office. 
  • Drop it off at your early voting site between October 15th and October 31st. Find your early voting site here.   
  • In person: You can vote early in-person between October 15th and October 31st or on election day on November 3rd. Please note that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the locations of polling precincts and that in-person voters will be required to follow all COVID-19 state safety guidelines. Curbside voting is available for individuals who are unable to enter the polling precinct. Find your early voting site here. Find your election day voting site here.  

Get Involved 

There are several options to for interested volunteers to get involved in the 2020 election: 

  • Election officials and student assistant election officials direct voters during in-person voting days. Learn more and sign up on the NC Board of Elections website.  
  • Train and sign up to be a poll monitor with Election Protection, the nation’s largest non-partisan voter protection coalition.  
  • Register your friends and family to vote with the information provided in this email! (Or forward this email to them!) 

Executive Director, Ken Schorr, Recognized by NC Justice Center with Lifetime Achievement Award

Congratulations, Ken!

We are immensely proud to announce that our executive director, Ken Schorr, received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the North Carolina Justice Center as a part of their 2020 Defenders of Justice ceremony this past weekend. The Justice Center recognized him “for his decades of leadership in legal services, as he tirelessly defended the interests of underrepresented North Carolinians.”  

Ken Schorr, Executive Director

Ken has had the privilege of advocating for low-income people in Little Rock, Phoenix, Dallas, and Charlotte for the duration of his career. Dedicated to those he serves, Ken has fought with the principle that legal aid lawyers must have the same undiluted loyalty to their clients and the same high level of competence as private lawyers.  

Access to legal services “is only a part” of justice for all. “We also need the political and economic systems to work to end poverty and racism, and to do that we need to work beyond the legal system,” Ken underscored in his acceptance speech.  

“Low income people need lawyers, they need advocates, and they need them to be able to use the full range of advocacy tools to promote and protect the rights of all low-income people. We must be able to do this for each individual client and to change systems adversely affecting all low-income people. It is a part of how we will end poverty, and racism, for everyone in our community.” 

Ken served as Litigation Director of Community Legal Services in Phoenix, Arizona, from 1979 to 1983 and as Executive Director of Legal Services of North Texas in Dallas, Texas, from 1983 to 1987. A native of Washington, D.C., he received a B.A. degree from Brandeis University in 1973, a J.D. degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1975 and an M.S. Degree in organization development from the American University School of Public Affairs and the NTL Institute in 2002. Ken has served as the director of The Advocacy Center since 1988. 

Ken is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Housing Partnership, a Special Advisor to and former member of the North Carolina Equal Access to Justice Commission, and has served on the boards of local, state and national nonprofits, including the N.C. Justice Center, Crisis Assistance Ministry, Uptown Men’s Shelter, United Way of Central Carolinas, North Carolina Legal Services Resource Center, Texas Legal Services Resource Center, National Legal Aid and Defender Association and NLADA Service Corporation. 

At Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy, Ken is known for his engagement with all staff, new and old, work on community and programmatic collaborations, staunch advocacy and support in all areas of our work, and his tie-dye shirt at the annual staff BBQ.  

Thank you, Ken, for your leadership, service, and unyielding commitment to justice for all people.  

In Memory of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

“Notorious RBG.”

. . .

We are deeply saddened by the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Justice Ginsburg was a champion for justice during her 27 years on the Court, and she has been the leading voice for Women’s Rights and Gender Equality throughout her tenure. She will be dearly missed as one of our nation and our legal field’s most consistent and principled voices for justice for all. She dedicated her career to the causes that drive both our organization and members of our staff.  

  • Ginsburg graduated from Columbia University Law School in 1959, tied for first in her class, but then had difficulty finding employment because of her gender.  
  • She held a US District Court clerkship and conducted research on Swedish civil procedure (for which she learned to speak Swedish),  became a Professor at Rutgers Law School, and then  was told that she would be paid less than her male colleagues.  

In 1972 she became the first woman tenured professor at Columbia Law School. She also co-founded the Women’s Rights Project at the ACLU, becoming General Counsel in 1973 and arguing six gender discrimination cases before the Supreme Court between 1973 and 1976. She won five of the six. Working as Thurgood Marshall had done in race discrimination cases, she devised an incremental legal strategy, challenging specific discriminatory statutes and building on each successive victory. She demonstrated that gender discrimination was harmful to us all. 

In 1980, Ginsburg was appointed to the DC Circuit Court of Appeals.  

And in 1993 to the US Supreme Court, becoming the second female Justice in US history confirmed by the US Senate on a vote of 96 to 3.  

We admire Justice Ginsburg  for her keen intellect, her determination in the face of injustice, and for her eloquence in majority and in dissent. She was personally close to people who agreed with her and with many who did not, notably Antonin Scalia.  Her powerful marriage and commitment to family have become a motivating example of how to succeed and strike a balance as a devoted spouse and mother and a tireless professional simultaneously.  

She was an inspiration for her own family as well. Both her daughter, Jane Ginsberg, and granddaughter, Clara Spera, went on to law school. Clara currently works at the ACLU advocating to expand reproductive care for low-income women. Spera notes that “no one has guided and inspired me more than my grandmother.” 

 Late in her life, Ginsburg became a cultural icon.  Younger generations, many of our staff members included, followed “Notorious RBG’s” footsteps and legacy to law school and the fight for justice.  

Justice Ginsburg’s  activism as a lawyer and Justice paved the way for much of the Advocacy Center’s work today, including, for example, her fierce advocacy for equal protection with respect to the Social Security Act and her continued support for the Affordable Care Act.  

We will not lose sight of the enduring legacy Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves behind, and we should embrace her determination to work toward opportunity and justice. 

As her death came during the celebration of Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, I  recall her words during services of that celebration years ago,  

“We are taught to do right, to love mercy, do justice, not because there’s going to be any reward in heaven or punishment in hell. We live righteously because that’s how people should live.”   

Justice Ginsburg passed on the eve of Rosh Hashanah, saved for the most righteous of people signifying she was given the full measure of the year. Justice Ginsburg gave to all of us the full measure of herself and for that we are all truly blessed. 

That is her legacy. She lived each day righteously, in pursuit of equality and justice for all, not for any accolades, but because it was the right and just thing to do. And in this she set perhaps the greatest example of all, that each of us, no matter our position or stature, can pursue these ideals in our own lives, “because that’s how people should live.”  

May we all live up to her challenge. May her memory be an inspiration

Sincerely,

Ken Schorr, Executive Director

North Carolina Extra Credit Grants: FAQs

In early September, the North Carolina legislature passed a coronavirus relief act providing for $335 Extra Credit Grant payments to North Carolina residents meant to offset the costs of virtual learning for their children during the pandemic. According to the act, most North Carolina households with children will automatically receive checks for $335 from the state this fall if they filed a state tax return by the October 15 deadline and met the other program eligibility requirements. Checks are in the process of being mailed and should be received on or before December 15.

Other individuals who were not required to file a state tax return had until October 15 to visit the North Carolina Department of Revenue website and complete an online Extra Credit Grant application or print and mail the application to the North Carolina Department of Revenue.

Application Deadline for Extra Credit Grant Extended for Some Low-Income Families

As the result of litigation brought by Robinson Bradshaw on behalf of Legal Aid of North Carolina, the Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy and several low-income families, on November 6, 2020, a court entered an order that reopened and extended the application period for eligible individuals to apply for the $335 Extra Credit Grant. These individuals may apply for the grant through December 7, 2020. The system to apply for $335 Extra Credit Grant will be ready soon. Sign up here for email updates when the application is ready and visit this page frequently for updates!

Regístrese para recibir actualizaciones por correo electrónico sobre las subvenciones de crédito adicional

Eligibility Requirements

  • An applicant must not have filed a 2019 state tax return solely because the individual’s gross income for the 2019 taxable year did not exceed the state filing requirements for the individual’s filing status (generally $10,000 per year if single and $20,000 per year if married).
  • An applicant must have met the all other requirements referenced in the law, including having at least one qualifying child age 16 or under for the 2019 calendar year and have been a North Carolina resident for all of the 2019 calendar year.  

Here are answers to frequently asked questions regarding the payments:

My spouse and I live together, can we each receive a $335 payment?

No. The grant is limited to one check for each household.

Do I receive a payment per child?

No. This is a one-time payment per eligible individual/household. If you have more than one child, you will still only receive one $335 Extra Credit Grant.

When will I receive my $335 payment?

The North Carolina Department of Revenue will send $335 Extra Credit Grants to all eligible applicants as soon as possible. 

Do I need to apply again if I already applied?

No. Only individuals who did not previously apply may submit an application during the extended application period. Eligible individuals who have already submitted an application will receive a check in the coming weeks.  

How do I get help?

If you have not already applied for an Extra Credit Grant and are eligible, sign up here for email updates. We will let you know when the application is ready. Be sure to visit this page frequently for updates!

Regístrese para recibir actualizaciones por correo electrónico sobre las subvenciones de crédito adicional

If you have remaining questions or run into problems with the email form or application, contact us at ncecg@charlottelegaladvocacy.org (preferred) or call us at 1-888-301-1555 for assistance.

CDC Eviction Moratorium: What you Need to Know

The federal government, through the Center for Disease Control, has announced a temporary halt on evictions through December 31, 2020 to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. Under the order, landlords and property owners are prohibited from evicting certain tenants impacted by COVID-19. If you are an immigrant, you may have concerns about claiming protection under the eviction moratorium. While we think the risk is minimal, we provide the information below to help you decide what is best for you and your family.

CDC Evictions Moratorium Flyer (English)
CDC Evictions Moratorium Flyer (Spanish)

How do I Qualify?

You qualify for the temporary protection against eviction if one of the following applies in your situation:

  • You cannot pay your full rent payment because of household income, loss of compensable hours of work or wages, lay-offs, or extraordinary out-of-pocket medical expenses.
  • Your income is below $99,000 annually for an individual/ $198,000 annually for a couple.
  • You are using your best efforts to make timely partial payments that are as close to the full payment as your circumstances permit.
  • You have used best efforts to obtain all available government assistance available for rent or housing.
  • If evicted, you will become homeless or will have to move in with others in close quarters.

How do I claim protection under the Temporary Eviction Moratorium?

To claim the protection against eviction, every adult tenant must sign an affidavit that includes an agreement to pay any accumulated rent arrears after December 31, 2020.

Why might I worry about signing the affidavit as an immigrant?

An immigrant may be denied a visa, lawful permanent resident status, or reentry into the US (as a lawful permanent resident) if she or he is likely to become a public charge. Public charge is defined as someone who is primarily dependent on the government for subsistence.

Why I SHOULD NOT worry about signing the affidavit even though I am an immigrant:

  • Getting help under the Temporary Eviction Moratorium is not considered cash or other financial assistance that could count against you as a federal benefit for the public charge test.
  • The income limit for the federal moratorium is substantially higher than the income threshold for the public charge test. When you state that your income is not above $99,000/$198,000 annually, you do not admit that your income is below 125% federal poverty guideline ($32,750 annual income for family of 4) and, therefore, you do not jeopardize your immigration application.

Is it conceivable that my immigration application could be denied because I signed the affidavit stating that I cannot afford my rent?

It is conceivable but very unlikely and, certainly, there should be a legal challenge to a finding of public charge on this basis.

Remember that public charge DOES NOT APPLY to:

  • Asylum or Refugee status
  • Green Card renewal
  • TPS, U or T Visa status
  • DACA status or renewal
  • Special Immigrant Juvenile Status
  • Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)
  • Immigrants who already have LPR/ a green card

CONTACT CHARLOTTE CENTER FOR LEGAL ADVOCACY TO SPEAK TO SOMEONE ABOUT YOUR OPTIONS.

  • 704-376-1600
  • Línea en español 800-247-1931

Obtenga La Ayuda Que Necesita Bajo La Moratoria Temporal De Desalojo

El gobierno federal, a través del Centro para el Control de Enfermedades, ha anunciado una suspensión temporal de TODOS los desalojos hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2020 para evitar una mayor propagación de COVID-19. Según la orden, los propietarios tienen prohibido desalojar a ciertos inquilinos afectados por COVID-19. Si usted es un inmigrante, es posible que le preocupe reclamar protección bajo la moratoria de desalojo. Mientras creemos que el riesgo es mínimo, la siguiente información puede ayudarle a decidir qué es lo mejor para usted y su familia.

¿Cómo califico para la moratoria?

Usted califica para la protección temporal contra el desalojo si alguna de las siguientes situaciones le aplica:

  • No puede pagar el pago total del alquiler debido a los ingresos del hogar, la pérdida de horas de trabajo o salarios compensables, despidos o gastos médicos extraordinarios de su bolsillo.
  • Sus ingresos son menos de $99,000 anuales por persona o $198,000 por pareja.
  • Está haciendo todo lo posible para realizar pagos parciales puntuales que se acerquen tanto al pago total como lo permitan sus circunstancias.
  • Ha hecho todo lo posible para obtener toda la asistencia gubernamental disponible para alquiler o vivienda.
  • Si lo desalojan, se quedará sin hogar o tendrá que mudarse con otras personas cercanas.

¿Cómo reclamo protección bajo la Moratoria Temporal de Desalojo?

Para reclamar la protección contra el desalojo, todos los inquilinos adultos deben firmar una declaración que incluye su acuerdo de pagar los atrasos de alquiler acumulados después del 31 de diciembre de 2020.

¿Por qué podría preocuparme firmar una declaración como inmigrante?

A un inmigrante se le puede negar una visa, el estatus de residente permanente legal o el reingreso a los EE. UU. (como un residente permanente) si es probable que se convierta en una carga pública. La carga pública se define como alguien que depende principalmente del gobierno para su subsistencia.

Porque no DEBO preocuparme por firmar la declaración a pesar de que soy un inmigrante?

  • Obtener ayuda bajo la Moratoria de Desalojo Temporal no es considerado dinero en efectivo u otra asistencia financiera que pueda contarse en su contra como un beneficio federal para la prueba de carga pública.
  • El límite de ingresos para la moratoria federal es sustancialmente más alto que el límite de ingresos para la prueba de carga pública. Cuando declara que sus ingresos no superan los $ 99,000 / $ 198,000 anuales, no admite que sus ingresos estén por debajo del 125% de la línea de pobreza federal (Ingresos anuales de $ 32,750 para una familia de 4) y, por lo tanto, no pone en peligro su solicitud de inmigración

¿Es concebible que mi solicitud de inmigración pueda ser negada por firmar una declaración declarando que no puedo pagar el alquiler?

Es concebible pero muy improbable y definitivamentedebería haber una impugnación i legal contra una determinación de carga pública basado en esto.

Recuerde que la carga pública NO APLICA a:

  • Asilados o refugiados
  • Renovación de su permiso de residencia
  • TPS, Visa U o Visa T
  • Estado de DACA o renovación de DACA
  • Estado Especial de Inmigrante Juvenil
  • Ley de Violencia Contra la Mujer (VAWA)
  • Inmigrantes que ya tienen Residencia Permanente

Comuníquese con Charlotte Center for Legal Advocacy para hablar con alguien sobre sus opciones.

  • Línea en español 800-247-1931
  • charlottelegaladvocacy.org